Coping with Kidney Disease – on Peritoneal Dialysis

By Shruti Mukundan, Peritoneal Dialysis Patient

MY NEW NORMAL: LIFE ON PERITONEAL DIALYSIS

“The first step towards getting somewhere is to decide you’re not going to stay where you are.” 

~ JP Morgan

When one is dealing with a chronic disease, one learns to celebrate small victories and every setback helps you become a stronger person.

After multiple vascular access failures, I had serious apprehensions for next access. A well-wisher suggested that I try peritoneal dialysis. I was skeptical, but since I had no real alternatives, I decided to explore this option.

I decided to meet Dr. Georgi Abraham and his team in Chennai. After they found me fit, I was operated upon and in a couple of weeks, my dialysis started. I got excellent training by a peritoneal dialysis technologist and I was ready to go!

The training included everything from sterilising the peritoneal dialysis space, washing of hands, cleaning the catheter site, dressing to giving oneself injections.  Only after the team is convinced that the patient has understood the process clearly, that he/she is allowed to do the peritoneal dialysis independently.

Today, I have completed more than 6 months on CAPD (Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis). I do three exchanges a day and try and lead an active life.

I highly recommend peritoneal dialysis as I have noticed positive changes ever since I started it. I have fewer blood pressure crashes, my parameters are stable and I have less fluid and dietary restrictions. The best part about peritoneal dialyis is the independence it gives and the confidence it instils in you about taking your health and care in your own hands.

During these uncertain COVID times, Peritoneal Dialysis comes as a boon, as you can do the dialysis at home. If a person is unwell, the caretaker can do the dialysis for them. Discussing with your physician and exploring the option of peritoneal dialysis seems to be a great way to resolve the issues of shortage of dialysis beds, infrequent dialysis and frequent hospital visitations.

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